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4821.  Section 377 and the Dignity of Indian Homosexuals- Alik Gupta (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
This paper seeks to determine the extent and manner in chich the prescription of "carnal intercourse against the order of nature" under Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, 1860 makes criminals our of homosexuals.
(PDF - 58 Kb) Document Date: 18 Nov 2006 (Downloads: 535)
4822.  Voices from Nigeria -IGLHRC 11/06 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals, and Transgenders Speak Out About the Same-Sex Bill <br><br> In January 2006, the Nigerian Minister for Justice presented to the Nigerian Federal Council a bill that would create criminal penalties for anyone engaging in same-sex marriages and relationships and which launches a vigorous attack on freedom of expression, assembly, and association in Africa’s most populous nation. Article 7 of the proposed Bill goes well beyond any intention to prevent same-sex marriages. If this Bill becomes law, anyone who publicly advocates for the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals and people of transgender status (LGBT) would be a criminal. Anyone forming or taking part in a gay or lesbian club or support group would face arrest. Critical HIV preventions efforts that target same-sex practicing men would be jeopardized as a result of the silencing effect of this legislation. <br> Consensual homosexual acts between adults are already illegal in Nigeria. Chapter 42, Section 214 of the Nigerian Federal Code penalizes consensual same-sex acts by 14 years imprisonment and in the Shari’a states the punishment for “sodomy” can be death. Meanwhille, there’s been virtually no public advocacy for same-sex marriage in Nigeria. Why then, is the Nigerian government considering this legislation at this time?
(PDF - 1,124 Kb) Document Date: 1 Nov 2006 (Downloads: 572)
4823.  4/3/06 - 13-year old Transgender Child Found Dead in Nepal; Allegations of Anti-Trans Murder Raised (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
IGLHRC<br> The International Gay & Lesbian Human Rights Commission learned today of the alleged murder of a thirteen year-old transgender child in Nepal. The Blue Diamond Society (BDS), Nepal's only organization for Sexual Minorities, reported that the child has been repeatedly abused and threatened by her father for being transgender.<br> Rupesh Mandal, from the Mahotari district of Nepal, was found dead by her mother on March 30. BDS reports that Mandal's father, Tapeshore Mandel, banished Rupesh from the family home upon finding that Rupesh had been visiting BDS's Drop in centre in Janakpur. Rupesh later rejoined the family after promising that she would stop going to BDS.
(PDF - 79 Kb) Document Date: 3 Apr 2006 (Downloads: 571)
4824.  Gay Nepal: A Struggle Against History- By Richard Ammon Globalgayz.com April 2006 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
Since its formation Sunil has quietly lobbied police and military chiefs about the existence of homosexuals and advocating tolerant attitudes. This work has paid off unevenly. On occasion local policemen have harassed gays or tried to blackmail them. An April 2003 raid on a mixed-gay disco resulted in the 'Stonewall' of Nepal when gays and transvestites fought back against being roughed up. More police were called; a policeman's ear was bitten off and a 'riot' ensued. Sunil was called at four AM to help free the men from jail but first he called a news reporter and then a lawyer. It was front-page news the next day and was carried on the wire services across the world. Sunil told me that the police chief later expressed regret and pledged to sensitize the police force about gay people.<br> However, a few months later another incident involved hoodlums who attacked a gay couple. The situation was compounded by police who roughed up the couple instead of arresting the attackers.<br> So the work of Blue Diamond goes on against daunting odds, against widespread ignorance and brutality and virtually no
(PDF - 68 Kb) Document Date: 1 Apr 2006 (Downloads: 485)
4825.  IGLHRC CONDEMNS VIOLENCE AND ARBITRARY ARRESTS IN NEPAL- 8/12/04 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
(New York, August 12, 2004) The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) calls for an immediate release of the 39 Metis in detention and for a full and thorough investigation into the violent acts perpetrated against sexual minorities in Nepal. Furthermore, we are deeply concerned by the apparent escalation of violence against those whose sexual and gender identity and expression do not conform to social norms in Nepal, as well as evidence of persecution of human rights defenders advocating on their behalf.<br> Recent reports indicate that the Nepalese police continue to act with impunity by refusing to fully investigate the abuses that have been brought to their attention. Police in Kathmandu are reportedly detaining 39 Metis (transgender persons) in Hanuman Dhoka police station on charges of a spreading perversion, after having arbitrarily arrested them in a series of raids on restaurants and bars on August 7, 2004. These 39 Metis are members of the Blue Diamond Society, a human rights advocacy and support group for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nepal. They have allegedly been held in detention without food and have suffered inhuman and degrading treatment by the police.
(PDF - 113 Kb) Document Date: 12 Aug 2004 (Downloads: 682)
4826.  Metis: Victims of Political Change in Nepal?-By Sunil Pant UKgaynews.org 11/26/06 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
http://www.ukgaynews.org.uk/Archive/2006nov/2601.htm<br><br> KATHMANDU, November 26, 2006 – After the recent peace deal between the Nepal Government and the Maoists, metis (cross dressing effeminate males), like every other Nepalese, were hoping that their rights would be ensured and they would also enjoy freedom and safety. But the situation and hate crimes they face from many directions each day makes them believe that their situation has become far worse than before. Before the ‘peace deal’, most of the violence against metis was committed by the Nepali police, but recently many metis have been victimized by men who called themselves Maoists. On Friday night (November 24), four men, two of them in combat uniform, came to the metis room at Lazimpat where few of them share a apartment building.<br> They were abused both physically and verbally, beaten badly, and told not to remain metis anymore.
(PDF - 156 Kb) Document Date: 26 Nov 2006 (Downloads: 469)
4827.  Nepal: Denounce Police Brutality Against Homosexuals in Kathmandu- IGLHRC 6/12/03 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
SUMMARY<br> On April 22, 2003, police approached a group of nine men who have sex with men (MSM)--cross-dressing for a disco party--as they hailed taxis to go home after a late-night meal. Calling them pejorative names, the police reportedly forced them to a corner across the road and ordered them to go to the police station. When some of the men asked if they had broken any law and questioned this order, the police allegedly attacked the group, beating them with batons and guns, whipping them with belts, and kicking them for several minutes. Seven of the men were taken into custody, where they faced further physical and verbal abuse. The other two men in the group managed to escape and informed Blue Diamond Society, a support organization for men who have sex with men in Nepal, about this incident. The director of the organization, with the help of an allied advocate, secured their release from custody four hours later. <br> Blue Diamond Society places this recent incident within a sordid pattern of police abuse--including acts of arbitrary arrest and detention, physical violence, verbal abuse, intimidation, extortion, and rape--against homosexuals in Nepal.
(PDF - 214 Kb) Document Date: 3 Jun 2003 (Downloads: 603)
4828.  Nepal: Gay Rights in High Places- By Cristi Hegranes SF Weekly 3/16/05 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
http://www.sfweekly.com/Issues/2005-03-16/news/worldview.html<br> As the king fights a Maoist insurrection, the Nepali Supreme Court decides whether homosexual acts are "bestiality"<br> When King Gyenendra dismantled democracy in Nepal last month to combat Maoist insurgents on his own, he also suspended civil liberties in the name of security. In the wake of the king's action, as internal conflict in Nepal reaches a fever pitch, the fight between traditional Hindu culture and the emerging homosexual population of Nepal has also reached critical mass.<br> On Friday, the Supreme Court of Nepal will take the first step toward either legitimizing or criminalizing homosexuality, when it hears a petition that seeks to ban the Blue Diamond Society. Given the unstable state of Nepal's government, the condition of the court system is also uncertain, but Sapana Malla, one of Nepal's most well-known human rights attorneys, who is representing BDS at the Supreme Court, says, "The courts have been functioning."
(PDF - 108 Kb) Document Date: 16 Mar 2005 (Downloads: 478)
4829.  Nepal: Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual South Asians' -'Trikone Magazine- June 2003 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
The problem was police harassment. Especially from people who claimed to be police but were never in uniform. They would say we will take you to the police station unless you pay us. Now people are getting more aware. They know that unless you are caught penetrating no one can do anything to you. But once I saw the policeman had pulled out his dick and trapped a guy. I caught them and said that was entrapment. I tell the guys not to be victims and just pay the money. Instead they should scream loudly and ask for help. Otherwise it is terrible. Sometimes these "police" would follow the guy home and then blackmail them. Guys would end up giving them their TV, VCR and refrigerator.<br> Has your organization had any confrontations with the police? A few months ago there was a Red Cross conference in the city and they asked us to perform. Some guys who were in drag decided to go to the disco. On the way back they were caught by the police on the street. The cops kept them for hours. They asked them to pull up their saris and stuck their dandas (batons) up their ass. The guys lost their money and gold chains. They called me in the middle of the night. I went to the police and say if you don't give the money and chains back, I'll take photos of the bruises and give it to the press. Then they changed their tune.
(PDF - 112 Kb) Document Date: 1 Jun 2003 (Downloads: 462)
4830.  Nepal: Renewed Police Brutality Against Transvestites, HIV/AIDS Outreach Workers- IGLHRC 7/24/03 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
During the past three months, Blue Diamond Society, a human rights advocacy and support group for men who have sex (MSM) in Nepal, has documented at least six incidences of police brutality targeting cross-dressing MSM and HIV/AIDS outreach workers serving MSM in Kathmandu. The attacks have not only created an atmosphere of fear and tension in the MSM community, but also prevented essential HIV/AIDS education efforts to vulnerable populations.<brb> Despite calls for police sensitivity trainings related to issues of sexual orientation and gender identity, these patterns of abuse have continued unabated. Join Blue Diamond Society in demanding an immediate end to this epidemic of police abuse against MSM and HIV/AIDS outreach workers; thorough and impartial investigations of all reported incidences of police abuse against these groups; and sensitivity trainings for police regarding issues of sexual orientation and expression and gender identity and expression.
(PDF - 269 Kb) Document Date: 24 Jul 2003 (Downloads: 615)
4831.  Nepal: The Kathmandu Statement on Sexual Orientation, Gender identity and Human Rights 2/20/04 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
Across Nepal, we face human rights abuses which threaten our safety, our livelihoods, and our lives. That we are targets of such abuse proves that we exist˜states do not persecute phantoms or ghosts. It also proves the necessity for action to safeguard our real situations and our basic rights.<br> Nepalese lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people confront harassment from police; abuse by our neighbors and our families; and violence and brutality˜sometimes punitive rape˜on the public places. We are discriminated against in the workplace. Many of our families force us into marriages against our will, in the hope of changing our inmost selves. Some of us, among them the very young, are evicted from our homes because of prejudice and fear.
(PDF - 49 Kb) Document Date: 20 Feb 2004 (Downloads: 482)
4832.  Nepal:Social Exclusion of Sexual and Gender Minorities-Report Prepared by Suni Babu Pant 10/05/05 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
Submitted to Enabling State Program (ESP)/DFID, Nepal<br> Final Report Prepared by Sunil Babu Pant<br> Contents<br> 1 Background 6<br> 1.1 Introduction and role of Blue Diamond Society 6<br> 1.2 Sexual and gender minorities 7<br> 1.3 Types of sexual and gender minorities Error! Bookmark not defined.<br> 2 The Social Exclusion of Sexual and Gender Minorities Study 9<br> 2.1 Study objectives and methodology 9<br> 2.2 Workshop findings 9 2.3 Survey analysis 10<br> 2.4 Recommendation and Strategy 11<br> 3 Strategy 15<br> ANNEXES: 16<br> Annex 1 The Blue Diamond Society 17<br> Annex 2 Press reports, press releases and letters about problems of sexual and gender minorities in Nepal 18<br> Annex 3 Photos of meti victims of violence 72<br> Annex 4 Sexual and gender minorities workshop, 12 June 2005 74<br> Annex 5 Media workshop, 29 July 2005 84<br> Annex 6 Judiciary and bar workshop, 31 July 2005 87<br> Annex 7 HMGN agencies, development partners and INGOs workshop, 5 August 2005 90<br> Annex 8 Police workshop, 10 August 2005 95<br> Annex 9 Religious leadersâ?? views on human rights and sexual minorities 99<br> Annex 10 12 June workshop questionnaire 105<br> Annex 11 12 June 2005 questionnaire survey results 110<br> Annex 12 Sexuality and gender: social, religious and political concepts 111<br> Annex 13 Testimonials 113
(PDF - 8,231 Kb) Document Date: 1 Oct 2005 (Downloads: 502)
4833.  Police Detain Lesbian Youths In Nepal: Protection Against Mob Violence Urgently Needed-IGLHRC 5/2000 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
IGLHRC, in cooperation with Community Promote--an NGO which advocates for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people in Nepal--urgently requests letters protesting the police detention of two young women involved in an emotional relationship with one another. The two women face a mounting threat of violence as news of the incident and of their relationship spreads throughout the country. IGLHRC demands that authorities move quickly to protect the two women against the possibility of violence.
(PDF - 188 Kb) Document Date: 1 May 2000 (Downloads: 624)
4834.  POLICE VIOLENCE CONTINUES IN NEPAL- IGLHRC 7/16/04 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
SUMMARY<br> For the past three years, Blue Diamond Society, a human rights advocacy and support group for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nepal, has documented and reported incidents of police brutality and attacks by individuals against those whose sexual and gender identity and expression do not conform to social norms. On June 1, 2004, a particularly violent rape and assault of two Metis (a term used to refer to "cross-dressing" males) by two men resulted in the first formal filing of such an incident with the police. On July 5, 2004, in response to this repeated pattern of violence against Metis and all sexual minorities, Blue Diamond Society organized a peaceful rally to express community concern and frustration, and to present a list of demands. However, this demonstration was met with even more by the police.<br> IGLHRC joins Blue Diamond Society in demanding an immediate end to this epidemic of police abuse and all acts of violence against these groups; thorough and impartial investigations of all reported incidences of police abuse against these groups; and sensitivity trainings for police regarding issues of sexual orientation and expression and gender identity and expression.
(PDF - 263 Kb) Document Date: 16 Jul 2004 (Downloads: 652)
4835.  Bangladesh: Human Rights and Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity- Amnesty International 3/31/04 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
In 2001, a gay couple from Bangladesh were denied refugee status in Australia. The Refugee Review Tribunal held that homosexuality was unacceptable in Bangladesh, and could lead to human rights abuse, but nonetheless found that the men would not be at risk of harm if they conducted themselves discreetly. In December 2003, the High Court of Australia allowed the couple’s appeal and found that the Refugee Review Tribunal had made an error of law when it divided Bangladeshi homosexuals into two groups, the discreet and the non-discreet.(28)
(PDF - 169 Kb) Document Date: 31 Mar 2004 (Downloads: 598)
4836.  China campuses are tolerant of homosexuals- Onlypunjab.com 2/1/06 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
A survey shows that universities in China are becoming more liberal about homosexuals, official news agency Xinhua reported Wednesday.
(PDF - 30 Kb) Document Date: 2 Feb 2006 (Downloads: 486)
4837.  Serbia: Official silence greets homophobic poster campaign- Amnesty International-10/15/04 (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
The Serbian right-wing group, Obraz, launched an anti-gay and lesbian poster campaign across Serbia in July this year as part of their continuing homophobic activities. The posters, which bore the slogan "Better Prevention than Cure (Better safe than sorry)", were illustrated with mock road signs suggesting that same sex couples should be prohibited.<br> Eight LGBT groups in Serbia sent an open letter to government officials following the appearance of the posters. They demanded that the officials, including the Minister for Human and Minority Rights, make a public statement against homophobia.
(PDF - 314 Kb) Document Date: 15 Oct 2004 (Downloads: 567)
4838.  Slovakia 1 HIV [91-95] (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
(PDF - 956 Kb) Document Date: 1 Jan 1991 (Downloads: 649)
4839.  Slovakia 1 SO [91-95] (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
(PDF - 684 Kb) Document Date: 1 Jan 1991 (Downloads: 567)
4840.  Slovakia Current Update SO (Sexual Minorities & HIV Status)
(PDF - 812 Kb) Document Date: 1 Jan 2000 (Downloads: 558)
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