Saturday, December 20

Sexual Minorities & HIV Status
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  C-Other Relevant Documents/Reports
[Otros Documentos y Reportes relacionados]

Please check out Links at the bottom of this segment-

Links:

2011 State Sponsored Homophobia-ILGA
2010 State-Sponsored Homophobia- ILGA
2009 US Country Reports on Human Rights Practices -03/10/10
Tracking the legality of same-sex marriage around the world -12/29/09
2008 Hate Crime Survey - Human Rights First
2009 IDAHO International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia May 17 2009 -Around the world.
HIV/AIDS & Human Rights - Human Rights Watch 12/30/07
IGLHRC General Research Links
ILGA: LGTBI Rights in the World 2008
Immigration Equality- Legal Decisions
The HIV / AIDS encyclopedia
The World of Immigration Detention: A System Hidden in Plain Sight DWN [USA]
Thirty countries deport HIV+ migrant workers, sixty six countries discriminate HIV+ travellers, including 19 in the WHO Europe region. ILGA 12/08/08
  Fleeing homophobia, every year 10,000 LGBTI asylum claims in Europe   First-ever EU-wide report reveals worrying trends in state responses to claims for asylum on the basis of LGBTI persecution. - By SABI NE JANSEN AND THOMAS SPI JKERBOER- COC NEDERLAND | VRI JE UNI VERSI TEI T AMSTERDAM, 11/28/11:
Fl eei ng Homophobi a i s a proj ect of COC Netherl ands  and VU Uni versi ty Amsterdam, i n cooperati on wi th the Hungari an Hel si nki Commi ttee, Avvocatura per i di ri tti LGBT/ Rete Lenf ord, and the European Counci l on Ref ugees and Exi l es.

Claims filed by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBTI) asylum seekers who are fleeing persecution and discrimination in their countries of origin are treated differently across the 27 states of the European Union, reveals 'Fleeing Homophobia', the first-ever EU-wide comparative study recently released by Sabine Jansen and Thomas Spijkerboer.

"We can estimate that every year the European Union receives 10,000 claims by LGBTI asylum seekers. The estimates are based on data from Belgium, Netherlands, Norway and Sweden, as data from other EU countries is scarse," said Simone Rossi, lawyer of the Italian Advocacy for LGBT Rights - Lenford Network, quoting the results of the Fleeing Homophobia research.

(PDF - 46 KB) Document Date: 28 Nov 2011
  Fleeing Homophobia- Asylum Claims Related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Europe- By Sabinene Jansen and Thomas Spijkerboer - a project of COC Netherlands  and VU University Amsterdam, in cooperation with the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, Avvocatura per i diritti LGBT/ Rete Lenford, and the European Council on Refugees and Exiles. on 09/20/11: http://www.humanrights.ie/index.php/2011/09/20/fleeing-homophobia-new-report-on-lgbti-asylum-claims-in-europe/
Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 7
1 INTRODUCTION 13
2 CRIMINALISATION 21
3 STATE PROTECTION AGAINST NON-STATE
PERSECUTION 27
4 THE DISCRETION REQUI REMENT 33
5 INTERNAL PROTECTION 41
6 CREDIBILITY 47
7 LATE DISCLOSURE 65
8 COUNTRY OF ORIGIN INFORMATION 71
9 RECEPTION 77
RECOMMENDATIONS 79
ANNEX I : LIST OF NATIONAL EXPERTS 83
ANNEX I I : ADVISORY PANEL 85

(PDF - 1,252 KB) Document Date: 20 Sep 2011
  A Decade Lost: Locating Gender in U.S. Counter-Terrorism - by CHRGJ and the Global Justice Clinic, NYU School of Law [Hilda Lui, Summer 2011 Intern, CHRGJ, NYU School of Law, Anthony Mohen, Summer 2011 Consultant, CHRGJ, NYU School of Law, Sarah Rutledge Alex Sinha, Summer 2011 Intern, CHRGJ, NYU School of Law Veerle Opgenhaffen, Senior Program Director, CHRGJ, NYU School of Law
Executive Summary:
A Decade Lost: Locating Gender in U.S. Counter-Terrorism provides the first global study of how the U.S. government?s (USG) counter-terrorism efforts profoundly implicate and impact women and sexual minorities. Over the last decade of the United States? ?War on Terror,? the oft-unspoken assumption that men suffer the most?both numerically and in terms of the nature of rights violations endured? has obscured the way women and sexual minorities experience counter-terrorism, rendering their rights violations invisible to policymakers and the human rights community alike. This failure to consider either the differential impacts of counter-terrorism on women, men, and sexual minorities or the ways in which such measures use and affect gender stereotypes and relations cannot continue. As the USG leads a world-wide trend toward a more holistic approach to countering terrorism that mobilizes the 3Ds?defense, diplomacy, and development?and increasingly emphasizes the role of women in national security, the extent to which counter-terrorism efforts include and impact women and sexual minorities is set to rise. As the ten-year anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001 approaches, now is the time for the USG and governments the world-over to take stock of, redress, and deter the gender-based violations that occur in a world characterized by the proliferation of terrorism and counter-terrorism and the squeezing of women and sexual minorities between the two.

(PDF - 1,600 KB) Document Date: 16 Sep 2011
  Africa: Bringing LGBTI Issues Into the Forced Migration Debate by Jeff Ogwaro, Allafrica.com, on 07/28/11: http://allafrica.com/stories/201107281003.html
According to Jjuuko, the implications of criminalising homosexuality include criminalising just the identity, relegating LGBTIs to second-class citizenship, police harassment, possibilities of blackmail and being accused of recruiting children. The options that remain for LGBTI persons when faced with the prospects of being prosecuted are to get out of the country, stay in the country and get harassed, arrested or prosecuted, and become internally displaced - which usually means relocation to a part of the country where one is not known and staying discrete while there.
(PDF - 59 KB) Document Date: 28 Jul 2011
  Unsafe Haven: The Security Challenges Facing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Turkey- A joint publication of Helsinki Citizens' Assembly?Turkey and ORAM?Organization for Refugee, Asylum and Migration. June 2011 : http://www.oraminternational.org/Publications/index.html
These protection gaps are reinforced by the general intolerance for sexual minorities in Turkey. Although  Turkish law does not criminalize homosexual conduct, it provides no protection from hate?motivated violence.  In the two years since the 2009 edition of Unsafe Haven: at least forty?five LGBT individuals were murdered in  hate?motivated crimes, many of the victims transgender. Likewise, a Turkish criminal court shut down an LGBT  organization for allegedly engaging in prostitution, a common accusation against LGBT advocates. The Minister  for Women and Family Affairs referred to homosexuality as a ?disease and biological disorder in need of  treatment? and the Telecommunications Directorate banned the use of the word ?gay? (gey) from Internet  domain names.   
(PDF - 2,297 KB) Document Date: 30 Jun 2011
  STATE SPONSORED HOMOPHOBIA REPORT 2011: HOMO- & TRANSPHOBIA SOON REJECTED JUST LIKE SEXISM & RACISM -in WORLD, ILGA,17/05/2011 : http://ilga.org/ilga/en/article/mZ9yrEp19R
Decriminalization of same-sex sexual acts between consenting adults remains a necessary precondition for the fight against homophobia, just as application of equal rights and social benefits for LGBTI individuals, couples and communities indicate the road to trod in those countries where decriminalization has been achieved. ILGA?s State Sponsored Homophobia Report, authored and edited by Eddy Bruce Jones and Lucas Itaborahy, is an excellent tool for activists, journalists, scholars and plain interested people alike to get a clear image...
(PDF - 585 KB) Document Date: 17 May 2011
  European Parliament calls for special protection of LGBT asylum-seekers - by Intergroup on LGBT Rights, www.lgbt-ep.eu, 04/06/11: http://www.lgbt-ep.eu/press-releases/european-parliament-calls-for-special-protection-of-lgbt-asylum-seekers/
Members of the European Parliament voted today to modernise the EU-wide system for examining asylum claims. Among the measures adopted today, groups of asylum-seekers with special needs were updated to include people fleeing persecution based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Measures include providing expert advice to asylum officials on sexual orientation and gender identity; protecting claimants? privacy; guaranteeing that physical examinations fully respect human dignity and integrity, for instance in cases involving minors or transgender people; and ensuring that applications by LGBT asylum-seekers are not ?fast-tracked? for removal to their country of origin.

Read More:
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&reference=A7-2011-0085&language=EN

(PDF - 171 KB) Document Date: 6 Apr 2011
  RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE: HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AND STANDARDS IN THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT- Amensty International, 03/01/11: http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/IOR53/001/2011/en/7f5eae8f-c008-4caf-ab59-0f84605b61e0/ior530012011en.pdf
CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW...............................................................................6
2. THE DEFINITIONS OF RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE MUST BE CONSISTENT WITH HUMAN RIGHTS PRINCIPLES.......................................................................................7
3. THE DEFINITIONS OF RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SHOULD BE INTERPRETED CONSISTENTLY WITH HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AND STANDARDS......................................9
4. CRIMES OF RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN MUST BE UNDERSTOOD IN TERMS OF COERCION, NOT CONSENT.............................................31
5. BEYOND THE DEFINITION: HOW HUMAN RIGHTS PRINCIPLES CAN BE APPLIED AND INTERPRETED IN THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT?S HEARINGS AND JURISPRUDENCE......................................................................................................33
6. ACTS OF RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE CAUSING SEVERE PAIN AND SUFFERING MUST BE CHARGED AS TORTURE..............................................................................38
7.CONCLUSION.........................................................................................................46

(PDF - 421 KB) Document Date: 1 Mar 2011
  In Our Own Words: Preferences, Values, and Perspectives on HIV Prevention and Treatment: A Civil Society Consultation with MSM & Transgender People - Commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) December 2010 : http://msmgf.org/files/msmgf/About_Us/Publications/WHO_Report1.pdf
Stigma and Violence against Gay Men and Transgender People Cited as Major Barrier to HIV Prevention and Treatment

In-depth interviews from around the world add to growing evidence that human rights violations play a central role in the spread of HIV

December 7, 2010 (Oakland, California) ? A new collection of in-depth interviews with men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people around the world indicates that stigma and discrimination play a central role in blocking access to life-saving HIV prevention and treatment services. The qualitative study, commissioned by the World Health Organization and conducted by the Global Forum on MSM & HIV (MSMGF), adds to a growing body of literature that points to the importance of addressing human rights violations as a necessary pillar of an effective global AIDS response.

?It is well known that there is a strong connection between human rights violations and the spread of HIV,? said Dr. George Ayala, Executive Officer of the MSMGF. ?These interviews paint a clear and often disturbing picture of exactly how things like stigma, discrimination and violence can interfere with HIV services.?

(PDF - 300 KB) Document Date: 7 Dec 2010
  Homophobia, transphobia and discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity 2010 Update Comparative legal analysis 1040 -
The report presents legal evolutions in fields affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the European Union between 2008 and 2010. It tackles issues such as gender reassignment legislation; non-discrimination and equality inside and outside of the workplace; freedom of expression and assembly for LGBT people; free movement and mutual recognition policies affecting the lives of LGBT people; and asylum policies. Among other conclusions, the legal study finds that a legal proposal stalemated in the Council of Ministers since 2008 would upgrade protection from discrimination outside of employment in as much as 17 EU countries. The EU Agency also singles out Lithuania for its uniquely retrograde attitude vis à vis freedom of expression. And the report finally concludes that the EU should look into a coherent approach to tackle discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity, such as the EU-wide multiannual Strategy for equality between women and men, or the recently-adopted European Union Disability Strategy.
(PDF - 743 KB) Document Date: 30 Nov 2010
  UN: Countries vote to accept execution of gays, PinkPaper.com, 11/18/10: http://news.pinkpaper.com/NewsStory/4319/18/11/2010/countries-­?vote-­?to-­? accept-­?execution-­?of-­?gays.aspx
Iran, Nigeria, Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iraq, Uganda, Benin, United Kingdom, United States, Australia, New Zealand

The United Nations voted against a resolution mandating that all member nations decriminalize homosexuality.

(PDF - 137 KB) Document Date: 18 Nov 2010
  NIJC: THE ONE-YEAR ASYLUM DEADLINE AND THE BIA: NO PROTECTION, NO PROCESS - a collaboration among the National Immigrant Justice Center?s National Asylum Partnership on Sexual Minorities, Human Rights First, and Penn State Law?s Center for Immigrants? Rights- 10/21/10 ; http://www.immigrantjustice.org/policy-resources/oneyeardeadlinereport/oneyeardeadline.html
The one-year deadline threatens the U.S. government?s funda- mental moral and legal commitment to protect refugees. Legal experts conclude that the filing deadline results in the arbitrary denial of protection to refugees.3 No study has examined how the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) applies the deadline until now. This report provides an understanding of the deadline?s impact on refugees whose asylum cases are decided by the BIA.

This study evaluated the BIA?s application and interpretation of the filing deadline by analyzing more than 3,472 BIA asylum cases decided during January of each year from 2005 to 2008. The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) provided these decisions in response to a Free- dom of Information Act (FOIA) request submitted by the National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC).

(PDF - 5,283 KB) Document Date: 21 Oct 2010
  Isolated in Detention- Limited access to lega Counsel in Immigration Detention Facilities Jeopardizes a Fair Day in Court- National Immigrant Justice Center: www.immigrationjustice.org/isolatedindetention
(PDF - 3,670 KB) Document Date: 15 Sep 2010
  More than 70 countries make being gay a crime People are being killed for their sexual orientation, despite progress made by some nations, including Britain, to eliminate prejudice- by Emily Dugan, www.independent.co.uk, on 08/01/10: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/politics/more-than-70-countries-make-being-gay-a-crime-2040850.html
ILGA's study of global gay rights shows that, elsewhere, admitting to being gay is still a matter of life and death. In much of Africa, the past decade has seen the lives of gay people go "from bad to worse", the report says. More than 50 per cent of African states have taken action to criminalise homosexuality and religious homophobia is rife. The picture is not much brighter in Asia, where 23 countries have made being gay a crime."

Latin America and the Caribbean are also home to many governments with a similar outlook. In Jamaica, sex with another man is described in the statute book as an "abominable crime".

Widney Brown of Amnesty International lists sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and Eastern Europe as the regions which give them the greatest concern for gay rights. Ms Brown also warned against Western nations becoming complacent. "The US is the only country in Nato with a prohibition of being openly gay in the military."

Renato Sabbadini, co-secretary general of ILGA, said: "The unworthiness rests entirely on these states, for theirs is the shame of depriving a significant number of their citizens of dignity, respect and the enjoyment of equal rights."

(PDF - 117 KB) Document Date: 1 Aug 2010
  ILGA: 76 countries ban gay sex, 7 have death penalty- by Rex Wockner, Rex Wockner International News # 840 05/31/10
ILGA said the 76 nations criminalize "consensual sexual acts between persons of the same sex in private over the age of consent."

They are: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei, Burundi, Cameroon, Comoros, Dominica, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, São Tomé and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tanzania, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe. In addition, gay sex is illegal in the Cook Islands (a self-governing democracy in free association with New Zealand), the Gaza Strip in Palestine, and Northern Cyprus, which is recognized only by Turkey.

(PDF - 28 KB) Document Date: 31 May 2010
  No Going Back- By Nathanael Miles, Stonewall, 05/30/10: http://www.stonewall.org.uk/what_we_do/research_and_policy/2874.asp
Stonewall has published the report No going back: Lesbian and gay people and the asylum system (2010), which is based on interviews with asylum-seekers and UK Border Agency decision-makers. It found almost systemic homophobia in our asylum system resulting in legitimate lesbian, gay and bisexual asylum seekers regularly being refused sanctuary.

The report revealed that officials rely on inaccurate information and outdated ideas about gay people and admit that they don?t know how to question them appropriately. As a result lesbians and gay men who?ve been raped, tortured and threatened with death are being returned to their countries ? in many cases to face further persecution. The report details how lesbian, gay and bisexual people seeking asylum experience significant and specific disadvantages as a direct consequence of their sexual orientation.

(PDF - 393 KB) Document Date: 30 May 2010
  State-Sponsored Homophobia- ILGA/ A world survey of laws prohibiting same sex activity between consenting adults. The research, by Daniel Ottosson, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden was updated in May 2010.: http://ilga.org/ilga/en/article/1161
A world survey of laws prohibiting same sex activity between consenting adults

The purpose of this annual report on State­sponsored Homophobia, as stated since its first edition in 2007, is to name and shame the states which in the 21st century deny the most fundamental human rights to LGBTI people, i.e. the right to life and freedom, in the hope that with every year more and more countries decide to abandon the 'community' of homophobic states.

Compared to last year's report, where we listed the 77 countries prosecuting people on ground of their sexual orientation, this year you will find ?only? 76 in the same list, including the infamous 5 which put people to death for their sexual orientation: Iran, Mauritania, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen (plus some parts of Nigeria and Somalia). One country less compared to the 2009 list may seem little progress, until one realizes that it hosts one sixth of the human population.

(PDF - 587 KB) Document Date: 17 May 2010
  UK: Failing The Grade Home Office initial decisions on lesbian and gay claims for asylum April 2010: http://www.uklgig.org.uk/docs/Failing%20the%20Grade%20UKLGIG%20April%202010.pdf
UK Lesbian and Gay Immigration Group Report on the UK Governments repeated failure to address the issues related to "sexual identity" when assessing claims for asylum from lesbians and gay men.
(PDF - 1,213 KB) Document Date: 25 Apr 2010
  47 European countries unanimously agree on historic human rights recommendations for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people- by ILGA on 03/31/10
- hate crime and hate speech;
- freedom of association, expression and peaceful assembly;
- right to respect for private and family life;
- employment;
- education;
- health;
- housing;
- sports;
- right to seek asylum.
  Additionally, the Recommendations prescribe that Member States should ensure that national human rights structures are clearly mandated to address discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity. They also encourage Member States to address multiple discrimination experienced by LGBT people.

(PDF - 217 KB) Document Date: 31 Mar 2010
  Urgency Required - Gay and Lesbian Rights are Human Rights- a report about LGBT rights in the context of human rights.- Hivos, Edited by Ireen Dubel and André Hielkema, 01/31/10: http://www.hivos.net/Hivos-Knowledge-Programme/Themes/Urgency-Required
[This book is an expanded English version of Urgentie Geboden (in Dutch), ISBN 978-90-6665- 967-4, that also appeared as Issue 33 / 34 (June 2008) of the Journal for Humanistics (ISSN 1567-7117)]

In 2009 homophobia appears to be the last accepted prejudice, where racism is rejected, anti-Semitism is condemned, and the oppression of women has lost its legitimacy.

Urgency Required. Gay and Lesbian Rights are Human Rights analyses the legal and political situation in different countries around the globe. Personal accounts from people living in those countries are also included. Two chapters take a closer look at significant developments in the history of LGBT and human rights politics like the Montreal Declaration of Human LGBT Rights and the Yogyakarta Principles, and theoretical discussion of terminology and concepts isn't neglected either. Urgency Required is certainly worth a read for anyone interested in LGBT politics.

(PDF - 5,163 KB) Document Date: 31 Jan 2010
  Globalizing the Culture Wars - U.S. CONSERVATIVES , AFRICAN CHURCHES , & HOMOPHOBIA - A publication of Political Research Associates by Kapya Kaoma 12/15/09- http://www.publiceye.org/publications/globalizing-the-culture-wars/
A groundbreaking investigation by Rev. Kapya Kaoma of Political Research Associates exposes how the U.S. Right mobilizes African Protestant clergy to protest any movement towards LGBT equality in U.S. mainline churches while promoting an agenda that criminalizes homosexuality in Africa.
(PDF - 1,225 KB) Document Date: 4 Jan 2010
  SELECTED DOCUMENTS RELATING TO SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY RELEVANT TO INTERNATIONAL REFUGEE PROTECTION - DIVISION OF INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION S (DIPS) United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees - October 2009 - http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4ae99c582.html.
UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Selected Documents Relating to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Relevant to International Refugee Protection, October 2009, available at: http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4ae99c582.html [accessed 2 November 2009]
(PDF - 200 KB) Document Date: 31 Oct 2009
  USA: Medical Examination of Aliens - Removal of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection from Definition of Communicable Disease of Public Health Significance -Docket No. CDC-2009-000, RIN 0920-AA26, -AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)- 10/30/09 :http://www.federalregister.gov/OFRUpload/OFRData/2009-26337_PI.pdf
ACTION: Final Rule

SUMMARY: Through this final rule, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is amending its regulations to remove "Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection" from the definition of communicable disease of public health significance and remove references to "HIV" from the scope of examinations for aliens.

(PDF - 141 KB) Document Date: 30 Oct 2009
  HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL, 12th SESSION ITEM 2 GENERAL DEBATE: UPDATE BY HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS- Joint Statement by:  International Lesbian and Gay Association ? Europe, Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, International Commission of Jurists, Center for Women?s Global Leadership (CWGL), Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights (RFSL), Danish National Organisation for Gay Men and Lesbians  (LBL), Lesbian and Gay Federation in Germany (LSVD), Global Rights, International Service for Human Rights[1] - delivered by John Fisher, 16 September, 2009
"Many States have commended your strong affirmations that no-one should face human rights violations on grounds including sexual orientation or gender identity.  This principled position is timely and appropriate.  As you note in your report, the grounds of discrimination are ?many and multifaceted?, and indeed the more marginalised or unpopular a particular group is, the more severe is the discrimination that they face."

Too many people continue to face criminal sanctions, violence, torture, death, denials of freedom of expression and assembly, and discrimination in enjoying economic, social and cultural rights in all regions of the world, solely because of their sexual orientation or gender identity."

(PDF - 73 KB) Document Date: 16 Sep 2009
  Unsafe Haven: The Security Challenges Facing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Turkey - July 09 - A report by Helsinki Citizen's Assembly and Organization for Refuge, Asylum, and Migration on 06/30/09: http://www.hyd.org.tr/?pid=752
"All refugees have problems in Turkey. However, I believe that some problems are very unique to our situation. Many LGBT refugees have no one to turn to. Refugees who fled their countries because of their political activism often can turn to their political parties for support. Refugees who fled for religious reasons can turn to their religious communities. Some refugees can turn to their families in their home country for support. Many of us left everything behind. We have been cut off from our communities, our families in our countries and have no one to turn to."
(PDF - 864 KB) Document Date: 30 Jun 2009
  IGLHRC Commentary: End the Criminal Treatment of LGBT People - By IGLHRC on 06/25/09 : http://www.iglhrc.org/cgi-bin/iowa/article/pressroom/iglhrcscommentaries/929.html
The following is an article by IGLHRC's Executive Director, Cary Johnson, which appears in the Spring 2009 issue of the NEW WORLD, the quarterly publication of the United Nations Association of the UK.

"More than 80 countries retain laws that criminalise LGBT people. Generically referred to as sodomy laws, many such provisions, including those in India, Uganda, Singapore and Jamaica to name a few, are relics of British colonial rule. Their prohibition of consensual same-sex acts was intended to rein in the varied sexual practices and traditions encountered in the colonies."

(PDF - 166 KB) Document Date: 25 Jun 2009
  Together, Apart- Organizing around Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Worldwide - by HRW on 06/11/09 on:http://www.hrw.org/node/83162
This 44-page report demonstrates that many groups defending LGBT rights ? especially throughout the global South ? still have limited access to funding, and courageously face sometimes-murderous attacks without adequate support from a broader human rights community.

The report is based on written surveys and in-depth interviews with more than 100 activists working for LGBT rights in five regions: sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; Eastern Europe and Central Asia; the Asia and Pacific region; and Latin America and the Caribbean.

(PDF - 461 KB) Document Date: 11 Jun 2009
  The urgent need to combat so-called "honour crimes" by Rapporteur: Mr John AUSTIN, United Kingdom, Socialist Group, Committee on Equal Opportunities for Women and Men, published on assembly.coe.int ib 05/14/09: http://assembly.coe.int/CommitteeDocs/2009/20090514_aegadoc20_2009.pdf
1. Drawing attention to its Resolution 1327 (2003) on ?So-called ?honour crimes??, the Parliamentary Assembly notes that the problem, far from diminishing, has worsened, including in Europe. It mainly affects women, who are its most frequent victims, both in Europe and worldwide, especially in patriarchal and fundamentalist communities and societies.

2. All forms of violence against women and girls in the name of traditional codes of honour are considered to be so-called "honour crimes" and constitute a serious violation of fundamental human rights. Such violence takes various forms, such as "honour killing", assault, torture, restrictions on free association, captivity or imprisonment, and interference in the choice of a spouse or partner.

3. The Assembly firmly denounces these crimes and dismisses any form of excuse for them: no tradition or culture can invoke any kind of honour to violate women's fundamental rights. There is no honour in so-called "honour crimes". The Assembly is determined to put a stop to this practice as a matter of great urgency.

(PDF - 177 KB) Document Date: 14 May 2009
  State-Sponsored Homophobia ILGA report. ILGA 2009 - by Daniel Ottosson, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden - published by ILGA on 05/13/09 http://www.ilga.org/news_results_b.asp?LanguageID=1&FileCategoryID=30&ZoneID=21&FileID=1161
A world survey of laws prohibiting same sex activity between consenting adults. The research, by Daniel Ottosson, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden was updated in May 2009.
(PDF - 717 KB) Document Date: 13 May 2009
  Homophobia and Discrimination on Grounds of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the EU Member States: Part II - The Social Situation 03/31/2009 - March 2009: http://fra.europa.eu/fraWebsite/attachments/FRA_hdgso_report_part2_en.pdf
The FRA publishes its new report "Homophobia and Discrimination on Grounds of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the EU Member States: Part II - The Social Situation". The report finds that discrimination, harassment and violence against LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) persons are widespread throughout the EU. The FRA calls on political decision-makers to further improve equality legislation and ensure accurate reporting, in order to improve the situation.
(PDF - 1,025 KB) Document Date: 31 Mar 2009
  PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT : Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Margaret Sekaggya* - HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL , Tenth session , Agenda item 3 - 02/12/09
Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders: References to human rights concerns based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
(PDF - 170 KB) Document Date: 12 Feb 2009
  Report submitted by the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Margaret Sekaggya -Addendum-Summary of cases transmitted to Governments and replies received? - HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL, Tenth session, Agenda item 3 - A/HRC/10/12/Add.1 - 03/04/09
Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders: References to human rights concerns based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Overview:
The reports of the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders identify lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender human rights defenders as particularly susceptible to violations and attacks, and as priorities for the mandate. Numerous human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity are reflected in the report on communications with governments.

Relevant State interventions during Interactive Dialogue might:
. commend the Special Rapporteur for continuing the work of her predecessor by identifying as a priority particularly marginalised groups of defenders, including those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender;
. highlight the range of human rights violations identified, including arrests, death threats, violent attacks, violations of freedoms of expression and assembly, raids on homes and offices, and torture; and
. ask what the Council can do to better address these important human rights concerns.

(PDF - 3,476 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2009
  HIV and Immigration- A Publication by Lambda Legal and Immigration Equality : http://www.lambdalegal.org/our-work/publications/hiv-and-immigration.html
(PDF - 9,078 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2009
  VIH e Inmigración- A Publication by Lambda Legal and Immigration Equality
(PDF - 8,389 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2009
  2008 Annual Report of the High Commissioner for Human Rights 12/30/08 : http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Press/OHCHR_Report_2008.pdf
EXCERPT:

The Annual Report of the High Commissioner for Human Rights is now available on-line, and publicised on the front page of the OHCHR website:

http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Press/OHCHR_Report_2008.pdf

"Those who are lesbian, gay or bisexual, those who are transgender, transsexual or intersex, are full and equal members of the human family and are entitled to be treated as such?, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navanethem Pillay told high-level panel discussion on human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity, held at UN Headquarters in New York on 18 December 2008. ?No human being should be denied their human rights simply because of their perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. No human being should be subject to discrimination, violence, criminal sanctions, or abuse simply because of their perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. It is not easy for decades of prejudice and intolerance to disappear by the stroke of the legislators? pen, but change must be started. It is our task and our challenge to move beyond a debate on whether all human beings have rights " for such questions were long ago laid to rest by the Universal Declaration " and instead to secure the climate for implementation? the High Commissioner said."

(PDF - 631 KB) Document Date: 30 Dec 2008
  UNAIDS: Decriminalisation is key to universal access to HIV treatment- By Staff Writer, PinkNews.co.uk- www.pinknews.co- 12/22/08
The United Nations agency responsible for coordinating global efforts to combat HIV and AIDS has called for "enhanced action to promote and protect the human rights of men who have sex with men, transgender people, lesbians, gays and bisexuals."

Last Thursday the UN General Assembly heard a statement on the universal human rights of LGBT people, and at the same time UNAIDS and the United Nations Development Programme issued their own joint statement:

(PDF - 88 KB) Document Date: 22 Dec 2008
  UN: General Assembly Statement Affirms Rights for All 66 States Condemn Violations Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity- Human Rights Watch 12/18/08
(New York, December 18, 2008) ? In a powerful victory for the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 66 nations at the UN General Assembly today supported a groundbreaking statement confirming that international human rights protections include sexual orientation and gender identity. It is the first time that a statement condemning rights abuses against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people has been presented in the General Assembly.

The statement drew unprecedented support from five continents, including six African nations. Argentina read the statement before the General Assembly. A cross-regional group of states coordinated the drafting of the statement, also including Brazil, Croatia, France, Gabon, Japan, the Netherlands, and Norway.

The 66 countries reaffirmed ?the principle of non-discrimination, which requires that human rights apply equally to every human being regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.? They stated they are ?deeply concerned by violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms based on sexual orientation or gender identity,? and said that ?violence, harassment, discrimination, exclusion, stigmatization and prejudice are directed against persons in all countries in the world because of sexual orientation or gender identity.?

(PDF - 87 KB) Document Date: 18 Dec 2008
  Gays, lesbians must be treated as equal members of human family - UN rights chief- http://www.un.org- 12/18/08
18 December 2008 ? The top United Nations human rights official lamented today that there are still too many countries that criminalize sexual relations between consenting adults of the same sex and that some 10 States still have laws making homosexual activity punishable by death.

?Those who are lesbian, gay or bisexual, those who are transgender, transsexual or intersex, are full and equal members of the human family and are entitled to be treated as such,? UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay told high-level panel discussion on human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity, held at UN Headquarters in New York.

(PDF - 81 KB) Document Date: 18 Dec 2008
  'Sodomy' Laws Show Survival of Colonial Injustice- Human Rights Watch- 12/17/08
(New York, December 17, 2008) - More than half of the world's remaining "sodomy" laws -criminalizing consensual homosexual conduct - are relics of British colonial rule, Human Rights Watch showed in a report published today. Human Rights Watch urged governments everywhere to affirm international human rights standards, and reject the oppressive legacies of colonialism, by repealing laws that criminalize consensual sexual activity among adults of the same sex.

The 66-page report, "This Alien Legacy: The Origins of ?Sodomy' Laws in British Colonialism," describes how laws in over three dozen countries, from India to Uganda and from Nigeria to Papua New Guinea, derive from a single law on homosexual conduct that British colonial rulers imposed on India in 1860. This year, the High Court in Delhi ended hearings in a years-long case seeking to decriminalize homosexual conduct there. A ruling in the landmark case is expected soon.

(PDF - 74 KB) Document Date: 17 Dec 2008
  This Alien Legacy: The Origins of "Sodomy" Laws in British Colonialism - Human Rigths Watch- 12/17/08
I.  Introduction
Three Trials
Colonial Laws and Contemporary Defenders

II. "Sodomy," Colonialism, and Codification

III. Colonial Power on the Street and over the Body
From "Vagrant" to "Eunuch"
Forensic Mythologies

IV. Interpreting Sodomy Laws: The Scope Expands
Jurisprudence: From "Crimes against Nature" to Communal Values
Ignoring Rape, Intensifying Stigma
"Gross Indecency" and Criminalizing Lesbians

V. Conclusion: The Emancipatory Potential of Decriminalization
Recommendations
Acknowledgements

(PDF - 494 KB) Document Date: 17 Dec 2008
  African taboos surrounding gays hamper access to HIV/AIDS programs- AFP, www.google.com- 12/05/08
DAKAR (AFP) ? In a continent where 38 out of 53 countries have criminalised consensual gay sex, African gays and lesbians have trouble getting access to HIV/AIDS programs, activists warned.

Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender activists took centre stage Thursday at the 15th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA), the first ICASA to give such attention to the specific problems of sexual minorities.

(PDF - 107 KB) Document Date: 5 Dec 2008
  African LGBTI People Demand a Strong Response to AIDS - IGLHRC 12/05/08
Dakar, December 5, 2008- A group of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people from more than 25 African countries has demanded an urgent response to the HIV pandemic affecting their communities. At a pre-conference held 3 days before the start of the International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA), delegates voiced concern about various human rights violations experienced by LGBTI people in Africa and the diaspora. These included socio-political exclusions related to HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), access to adequate health services and other related issues.
(PDF - 103 KB) Document Date: 5 Dec 2008
  Conseil Canadien pour les régufugiés/ Canadian Counsil for refugees- 2008 Refugee Clain Data & IRB Menter Grant Rates: by by Sean Rehaag Assistant Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School- http://www.ccrweb.ca/documents/rehaagdatamarch09.htm
Data obtained from the Immigration and Refugee Board through an Access to Information Request reveals vast disparities in refugee claim grant rates across IRB Members in 2008.

In 2008, some Members very rarely granted refugee status, including Andre Lamoureux (3.6%, 55 decisions) and Roger Houde (4.4%, 92 decisions). Others granted refugee status in virtually all the cases they heard, including Marie Chevrier (99.6%, 262 decisions) and Richard Dawson (98.8%, 257 decisions).

(PDF - 134 KB) Document Date: 1 Dec 2008
  Conseil Canadien pour les régufugiés/ Canadian Counsil for refugees- 2008 Refugee Clain Data & IRB Menter Grant Rates: by by Sean Rehaag Assistant Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School- http://www.ccrweb.ca/documents/rehaagdatamarch09.htm
Data obtained from the Immigration and Refugee Board through an Access to Information Request reveals vast disparities in refugee claim grant rates across IRB Members in 2008.

In 2008, some Members very rarely granted refugee status, including Andre Lamoureux (3.6%, 55 decisions) and Roger Houde (4.4%, 92 decisions). Others granted refugee status in virtually all the cases they heard, including Marie Chevrier (99.6%, 262 decisions) and Richard Dawson (98.8%, 257 decisions).

(PDF - 134 KB) Document Date: 1 Dec 2008
  UNHCR GUIDANCE NOTE ON REFUGEE CLAIMS RELATING TO SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY -United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Protection Policy and Legal Advice Section Division of International Protection Services Geneva- 11/21/08
Table of Contents

I. INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................................................4
II. SUBSTANTIVE ANALYSIS..................................................................................................................6
A. BACKGROUND........................................................................................................................................6
B. WELL-FOUNDED FEAR OF PERSECUTION..................................................................................7
i. Laws criminalizing homosexual conduct.......................................................................................10
ii. Fear of future persecution...............................................................................................................12
iii. Avoiding persecution.....................................................................................................................12
iv. Agents of persecution.....................................................................................................................13
v. The causal link (?for reasons of?)..................................................................................................14
C. CONVENTION GROUNDS..............................................................................................................14
D. INTERNAL FLIGHT / RELOCATION ALTERNATIVE.................................................................15
E. BURDEN OF PROOF AND CREDIBILITY (ASSESSMENT).........................................................16
F. SUR PLACE CLAIMS........................................................................................................................17
III. CONCLUSION..................................................................................................................................18

(PDF - 332 KB) Document Date: 21 Nov 2008
  Report on mapping of MSM groups, organisations and networks in South Asia- APCOM- 11/03/08
With support from Hivos and UNAIDS respectively APCOM has developed two mapping reports for MSM and Transgender organizations is South Asia. These mapping reports were produced as part of a larger strategy for mapping MSM and TG organisations in the Asia and Pacific region, and provision of networking support for such organizations in areas where there has been limited development. This process is being supported by Hivos. You can access these two reports in the APCOM website via the following URLs:

http://www.msmasia.org/tl_files/resources/APCOM%20Report%203%20MSM%20Mapping%20South%20Asia.pdf

Conclusions
The population of South Asia is approximately 1.6 billion people (more than China?s 1.3 billion), and yet only 179 groups, networks and organizations providing HIV services for MSM were identi?ed across the 9 coun- tries. And of these, only 116 were MSM community-based organizations. This is grossly inadequate in terms of coverage, in a time of a growing HIV crisis among MSM,7 and where the demand is for universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services appropriate to the issues, needs and concerns of the broad diversity of MSM risks and vulnerabilities.

This in equity between need and service provision highlights the level of stigma and discrimination by a broad range of stakeholders, not only at institutional levels of government and donors, but also at state and local lev- els. It also highlights the urgent need to provide support for community development and mobilising of MSM to be able to respond more effectively to the HIV crisis. In fact, the lack of MSM coverage is itself a crisis. This means expanding the level of appropriate technical assistance and support, along with mentoring and capacity development for local groups and networks to mobilise around the issue of sexual health needs and concerns for their constituents.

Are we still in the dark days of ?silence = death??

(PDF - 815 KB) Document Date: 3 Nov 2008
  HIV Vulnerabilities of Migrant Women: from Asia to the Arab States - by UNDP Regional Centre in Colombo, www.undprcc.lk, on 10/31/08: http://www2.undprcc.lk/resource_centre/pub_pdfs/P1105.pdf
"The Arab States are the primary destinations for many migrant workers from various countries in Asia, including Bangladesh, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. Of these migrants, many are women: in 2005, 59 percent of Sri Lankan migrant workers were women, of which 90 percent were domestic workers, largely in the Arab States. Since 2000, women have comprised 90 percent of yearly deployment of new hires for service workers in the Philippines, of which 30 percent are employed as domestic help. A similar preference for the Arab States is observed in the case of Bangladesh, where between 1991 and 2007, 60 percent of female migrants left to find employment in the Arab States.

Stigma and discrimination confront women migrant workers in all stages of migration in a far broader context than HIV alone, though HIV does exacerbate the situation. In some cases women migrate as a means to overcome discrimination related to the stigma of being widowed, of being single and beyond the socially acceptable age of marriage, and/or of being poor and dispossessed of property and material assets. However, in migrating from home they also transgress a social norm that assumes the immobility of women, and thus in some countries they face the stigma of being viewed as an 'impure' woman who lives away from the watchful eye of family and community."

(PDF - 2,385 KB) Document Date: 31 Oct 2008
  The Difficulties of US Asylum Claims Based on Sexual Orientation - By Swetha Sridharan, Council on Foreign Relations- www.migrationinformation.org- 10/29/08
Since 1998, the United States has processed an average of 46,000 asylum applications each year, according to estimates from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Winning asylum in this country, however, is not an easy task. On average, only 62 percent of these applications have been successful.

Asylum claims based on persecution related to a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individual's sexual orientation are particularly difficult to file, argue, and win ? even with substantial evidence of persecution and ill-treatment.

LGBT asylum applicants will continue to face difficulties in getting their claims approved so long as US constitutional and statutory laws relating to same-sex couples and sexual conduct remain static.

(PDF - 111 KB) Document Date: 29 Oct 2008
  The Difficulties of US Asylum Claims Based on Sexual Orientation - By Swetha Sridharan, Council on Foreign Relations- www.migrationinformation.org- 10/29/08
Since 1998, the United States has processed an average of 46,000 asylum applications each year, according to estimates from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Winning asylum in this country, however, is not an easy task. On average, only 62 percent of these applications have been successful.

Asylum claims based on persecution related to a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individual's sexual orientation are particularly difficult to file, argue, and win ? even with substantial evidence of persecution and ill-treatment.

LGBT asylum applicants will continue to face difficulties in getting their claims approved so long as US constitutional and statutory laws relating to same-sex couples and sexual conduct remain static.

(PDF - 111 KB) Document Date: 29 Oct 2008
  Love, hate and the law: decriminalizing homosexuality- Amnesty International- 07/04/08
Index Number: POL 30/003/2008
Date Published: 4 July 2008

The paper explores the different legal approaches to criminalizing homosexuality, including less direct approaches that may not explicitly criminalize same-sex sexual conduct but instead seek to prevent the promotion of homosexuality, protect children, or respond to public health concerns. Decriminalization is not the whole answer, but it is a key step towards respecting, protecting and fulfilling the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, same-sex practicing and transgender people.

(PDF - 3,012 KB) Document Date: 4 Jul 2008
  Homophobia and Discrimination on Grounds of Sexual Orientation in the EU Member States Part I ? Legal Analysis June 2008 : http://fra.europa.eu/fraWebsite/material/pub/comparativestudy/FRA_hdgso_part1_en.pdf
The report examines the situation of homophobia in the 27 EU Member States. It analyses comparatively key legal provisions, relevant judicial data, such as court decisions, and case law in the Member States. In addition, the report identifies and highlights 'good practice' in the form of positive measures and initiatives to overcome underreporting of LGBT (Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transsexuals) discrimination, to promote inclusion and to protect transgender persons. FRA 's legal analysis is the first of two reports related to homophobia and discrimination experienced by members of the LGBT community.
(PDF - 955 KB) Document Date: 30 Jun 2008
  Women are Victims, Men Make Choices: The Invisibility of Men and Boys in the Global Sex Trade - by Jeffery P. Dennis - [DOI 10.1007/s12147-008-9051-y] Ó Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008 - 05/20/08
Abstract
The invisibility of men and boys in scholarly discussions of the global sex trade was analyzed through a sample of 166 recent articles published in social science journals. Most failed to acknowledge the existence of male sex workers at all. When male sex workers were discussed, they were assigned considerably more agency than female sex workers, the chief danger ascribed to them was HIV rather than violence, and the question of their sexual orientation was always addressed, whereas female sex workers were always assumed heterosexual. The results are discussed in the context of world system theory, Orientalism, and heteronormativity. Keywords Heteronormativity
? Masculinity ? Prostitution ? Sex workers ? Traf?cking

(PDF - 191 KB) Document Date: 20 May 2008
  ILGA Report: State Sponsored Homophobia- A world survey of laws prohibiting same sex activity between consenting aduts-By Daniel Ottosson 05/15/08
ILGA publishes 2008 report on State-sponsored Homophobia
Being lesbian or gay is risking jail time in 86 countries and death penalty in 7.

The research, conducted by Daniel Ottosson, only deals with legislation criminalizing consensual sexual acts between persons of the same sex in private above the age of consent. Laws dealing with such acts in public, with under aged people, with force or by any other reason are not included. Nor does it include countries where such acts are legal. References to all legislation can be found in the foot notes, the foot note list and the source list in the end of the report.

This year, ILGA has also included a list of countries according to their legislations affecting LGBTI people. This will allow readers to get a quick and comprehensive overview on the legal situation in the world: from countries penalising homosexual activity with death penalty to the few ones allowing adoption for same sex couples.

(PDF - 458 KB) Document Date: 15 May 2008
  US: Migrant Detainees Suffer From Inadequate Medical Care- Improve Treatment of HIV-Positive Immigrants in Detention- HRW 05/08/08
(Mexico City, August 5, 2008) ? Inferior medical care for HIV-positive immigrant detainees threatens their health, and ultimately their lives, Human Rights Watch said today at the 2008 International AIDS Conference in Mexico City. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) ? the agency charged with providing health care services to detainees ? fails to ensure timely HIV prevention and treatment services, putting many at risk of infection, resistance to treatment, and even death.

?Inconsistent and inadequate medical care for HIV-positive immigration detainees endangers their health and lives,? said Megan McLemore of Human Rights Watch?s Health and Human Rights Program. ?Unless Homeland Security reforms its treatment systems, more immigrants will die or fall sick for no good reason.?

In a December 2007 report, ?Chronic Indifference: HIV/AIDS Services for Immigrants Detained in the United States,? Human Rights Watch documented the difficulties encountered by detainees with HIV and AIDS in obtaining essential medical services.

(PDF - 77 KB) Document Date: 8 May 2008
  U.N. turns down gay groups- Rex Wockner International News #721- 2/18/08
The United Nations Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations is again opposing and delaying gay groups' requests for consultative status with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

On Feb. 11, the committee recommended denial of, or deferred action on, the applications of Spain's State Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Transsexuals and Bisexuals (FELGTB); the Brazilian Association of Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals, Transvestites and Transsexuals (ABGLT); and the Dutch national gay organization COC (its former initials are now its full name).

(PDF - 21 KB) Document Date: 18 Feb 2008
  CONCEPTUALIZING PRIVATE VIOLENCE AGAINST SEXUAL MINORITIES AS GENDERED VIOLENCE: AN INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW PERSPECTIVE- James Willets
60 Albany Law Review 98

I. INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................... 990
II. DEFINING THE PROBLEM: PRIVATE VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND SEXUAL MINORITIES ................................................................................................................................................ 992
III. SEXUAL MINORITIES AS "GENDER OUTLAWS" ............................................................................. 1006
IV. PIERCING THE PUBLIC/PRIVATE DISTINCTION: OVERCOMING INTERNATIONAL LAW'S DEFERENCE TO NATIONAL LAW AND LOCAL CUSTOM .......................................................................................... 1016
A. The Opportunities and Limitations of the Right to Privacy in Protecting Women and Sexual Minorities from Gendered Violence ...................................................................................................................... 1022
B. The Gendered Context of Equal Protection Under the Law ........................................................... 1030
V. PROGRESS IN PIERCING THE PUBLIC/PRIVATE DISTINCTION IN NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LAW ................................................................................................................................................................ 1038
A. Hate Crime ........................................................................................................................................ 1038
B. Hate Speech ....................................................................................................................................... 1040
C. Recognition by National Governments and International Law of Private Gendered Violence Against Sexual Minorities as Grounds for Asylum .............................................................................................. 1043
VI. CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................................................... 1049

(PDF - 366 KB) Document Date: 17 Jan 2008
  IGLHRC: United Nations: Defeat for Discrimination, Victory for Inclusion- 07-23-08
(New York, July 23, 2008) - The decision by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) granting consultative status to two groups that work on sexual orientation and gender identity is a victory in the ongoing struggle for inclusion at the UN, a coalition of six human rights organizations said today. The two groups approved on July 21 and 22, 2008 are COC Netherlands and the State Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Transexuals and Bisexuals of Spain (FELGTB), national organizations representing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the Netherlands and Spain.
(PDF - 74 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2008
  Chronic Indifference: HIV/AIDS Services for Immigrants Detained by the United States- HRW 12/30/07
http://hrw.org/reports/2007/us1207/

I. Executive Summary...............................................................................................1
II. Recommendations...............................................................................................4
III. Background.........................................................................................................7
IV. Methodology.....................................................................................................16
V. Findings.............................................................................................................19
VIII. Conclusion.....................................................................................................63
Acknowledgements................................................................................................64
Appendix...............................................................................................................65

The death of Victoria Arellano in federal immigration custody is an extreme, but not surprising, example of the suffering experienced by immigration detainees with HIV/AIDS. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) fails to collect basic information to monitor immigrant detainees with HIV/AIDS, has sub-standard policies and procedures for ensuring appropriate HIV/AIDS care and services, and inadequately supervises the care that is provided. The consequence of this willful indifference is poor care, untreated infection, increased risk of resistance to HIV medications, and even death.

(PDF - 442 KB) Document Date: 30 Dec 2007
  ILGA- State-Sponsored Homophobia- A World Survey by Daniel Ottosson Aprl 07
http://www.ilga.org/news_results.asp?LanguageID=1&FileID=1058&FileCategory=9&ZoneID=7

A world survey of laws prohibiting same sex activity between consenting adults

In 2007, no less than 85 member states of the United Nations still criminalize consensual same sex acts among adults.

The impressive collection of laws presented in this report is an attempt to show the extent of State homophobia in the world. In 2007, no less than 85 member states of the United Nations still criminalize consensual same sex acts among adults, thus institutionally promoting a culture of hatred. With this publication, we hope to raise awareness about this reality which extent remains unknown to the vast majority of people. Although many of the countries listed in the report do not systematically implement those laws, their mere existence reinforces a culture where a significant portion of the citizens need to hide from the rest of the population out of fear. A culture where hatred and violence are somehow justified by the State and force people into invisibility or into denying who they truly are. Whether imported by colonial empires or the result of legislations culturally shaped by religious beliefs, if not deriving directly from a conservative interpretation of religious texts, homophobic laws are the fruit of a certain time and context in history.

(PDF - 0 KB) Document Date: 30 Apr 2007
  The Yogacarta Principals - [WE, THE INTERNATIONAL PANEL OF EXPERTS IN INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AND ON SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY ] by Sonia Onufer Corrêa, Co-Chairperson and Vitit Muntarbhorn, Co-Chairperson on April 2007 on: http://www.asiapacificforum.net/issues/sexual_orientation
Principles on the application of international human rights law in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity ? March 2007

THESE PRINCIPLES AND RECOMMENDATIONS reflect the application of international human rights law to the lives and experiences of persons of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities, and nothing herein should be interpreted as restricting or in any way limiting the rights and freedoms of such persons as recognised in international, regional or national law or standards.

(PDF - 178 KB) Document Date: 30 Apr 2007
  Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and International Human Rights Law: Contextualising theYogyakarta Principles-Michael O'Flaherty and John Fisher, 03/26/07: http://www.yogyakartaprinciples.org/yogyakarta-article-human-rights-law-review.pdf
"Violations directed against lesbians because of their sex are often inseparable from violations directed against them because of their sexual orientation. Community restrictions on women?s sexuality result in a range of human rights violations, such as the multiple rape of a lesbian in Zimbabwe, arranged by her own family in an attempt to "cure" her of her homosexuality"
(PDF - 440 KB) Document Date: 26 Mar 2007
  UN STATEMENT ON SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY-12/5/06
NGOs FROM AROUND THE WORLD CELEBRATE HISTORIC UN STATEMENT ON SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND GENDER IDENTITY

NGOs from around the world welcomed a landmark statement on human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity, delivered last Friday at the United Nations Human Rights Council by Norway on behalf of 54 States.
The statement condemns human rights violations directed against people because of their sexual orientation or gender identity, commends the work of UN mechanisms and civil society in this area, calls on UN Special Procedures and treaty bodies to address these issues, and urges the Human Rights Council to pay due attention to human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity, including consideration at an upcoming session.
“This is the largest-ever statement delivered at the UN on sexual orientation issues, and the first ever to explicitly highlight human rights violations based on gender identity.” said John Fisher, Co-Director of ARC International. “We are encouraged by the measurable increase in cross-regional support for sexual orientation and gender identity issues in recent years. The time has come to ensure that human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity receive the international scrutiny and condemnation they demand.”
“Numerous Special Procedures have documented violations of the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons,” said Chris Sidoti, Director of the International Service for Human Rights. “These violations include use of the death penalty, torture, criminal sanctions, police harassment, violence, rape, beatings, disappearances, denials of freedom of expression, raids and closures of NGOs, and discrimination in education, employment, health and housing. Too often in the past, these human rights abuses have passed in silence. Now, the era of invisibility is over.”

(PDF - 158 KB) Document Date: 5 Dec 2006
  3rd SESSION OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL-JOINT STATEMENT-UNHCR- 12/1/06
3rd SESSION OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
JOINT STATEMENT
H.E. WEGGER CHR. STRØMMEN
AMBASSADOR
PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF NORWAY TO THE UNITED NATIONS OFFICE AND OTHER INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN GENEVA
Geneva, December 1, 2006
I have the honour to make this statement on human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity on behalf of the following 54 States, including 18 members of the Human Rights Council: Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Panama, Peru, Poland, Portugal, the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of Moldova, Romania, Serbia, Spain, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, Timor-Leste, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Uruguay, and my own country Norway.

(PDF - 1,195 KB) Document Date: 1 Dec 2006
  HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL-3rd Session-NGO Joint Statement on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and HR
Numerous Special Procedures have documented violations of the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons, including use of the death penalty, torture, criminal sanctions, police harassment, violence, rape, beatings, disappearances, denials of freedom of expression, raids and closures of NGOs, and discrimination in education, employment, health and housing. We urge all Special Procedures to integrate these important issues of human rights concern into their relevant mandates.
Too often in the past, these human rights abuses have passed in silence. As UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour stated earlier this year:
?[V]iolence against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons is frequently unreported, undocumented and goes ultimately unpunished. ? This shameful silence is the ultimate rejection of the fundamental principle of universality of rights. "Excluding LGBT individuals from these protections clearly violates international human rights law as well as the common standards of humanity that define us all."

(PDF - 187 KB) Document Date: 1 Dec 2006
  Wrap up survey on the laws worldwide affecting gay, lesbian and trans-gendered people- Daniel Ottoss
Introduction
This survey aims to give an updated and brief view of the legal situation for LGBT people worldwide. Researched information consists mostly of first hand sources of legal texts, and in some cases of second and third hand sources from governmental and non- governmental organizations, if the sources have been found trustworthy. It was performed from the year 2001 to July 2006.

(PDF - 273 KB) Document Date: 1 Jul 2006
  World's worst places to live if you're gay-Pukaar July 2006 Issue 54
U.S. allies listed among gay human rights abusers
The latest U.S. State Department human rights report has some gay activists calling on the government to heed its own advice and impose sanctions on countries that target gay citizens with abuse. Each year, the State Department issues a human rights report detailing abuse committed by foreign governments, including abuse motivated by victimsâ?? sexual orientation and gender identity. Gay rights advocates applauded the 2005 report, released last week, for its detailing of anti-gay abuses committed in a range of countries, including Iran, Poland, Brazil and the United Arab Emirates. "I was glad to see [the report] talked about issues of discrimination,â? said Scott Long, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Rights program at Human Rights Watch. Past reports, he said, â??were willing to address egregious persecution but not everyday life.â?

(PDF - 69 KB) Document Date: 1 Jul 2006
  U. N. rejects gay groups- Rex Wockner International News # 614 1/30/06
The United Nations Economic and Social Council [ECOSOC] has rejected the application for consultative status submitted by the International Gay and Lesbian Gay Association (ILGA) and Denmark's National Association for Gays and Lesbians (LBL)
(PDF - 45 KB) Document Date: 30 Jan 2006
  Sexual Minorities and the Law: A World Survey [Updated July 2006 ] Amnesty International
(PDF - 139 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2006
  Homosexual Rights Around The World-A Nation's (legal) Perspective-Courtesy of billmyers@bright.net
2006
COUNTRIES WITH SODOMY LAWS (HOMOSEXUAL ACTIVITY IS ILLEGAL)
COUNTRIES WITH NO SODOMY LAWS (HOMOSEXUAL ACTIVITY IS LEGAL)
QUESTIONABLE SODOMY LAW COUNTRIES (UNSURE IF THEY HAVE A SODOMY LAW)
COUNTRIES WHERE HOMOSEXUAL ACTS ARE PUNISHABLE BY DEATH
COUNTRIES THAT ALLOW HOMOSEXUALS IN ITS MILITARY
COUNTRIES THAT HAVE A NATIONAL GAY RIGHTS LAW THAT BANS SOME ANTI-GAY DISCRIMINATION
COUNTRIES THAT HAVE A HIGHER AGE OF SEXUAL CONSENT FOR HOMOSEXUALS THAN FOR HETEROSEXUALS
COUNTRIES THAT ALLOW FOREIGN PARTNERS OF ITS HOMOSEXUAL CITIZENRY TO RECEIVE RESIDENCY PERMITS
COUNTRIES THAT GIVE NATIONAL DOMESTIC PARTNER BENEFITS TO HOMOSEXUAL COUPLES
COUNTRIES THAT ALLOW HOMOSEXUAL COUPLES TO MARRY

(PDF - 268 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2006
  Appendix B: Countries Protecting Same-Sex Couples' Immigration Rights- HRW 2006
Human Rights Watch and Immigration Equality have identified nineteen countries that recognize lesbian and gay relationships for immigration purposes. This appendix outlines how they do so.
The forms of such recognition are diverse; they belie the argument that acknowledging same-sex partnerships in the immigration system is necessarily a first step toward equality in civil marriage.

(PDF - 272 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2006
  Human Rights Report ICJ
Human Rights Report ICJ-March-April 2005
Report by the International Commission of Jurists, 61st Session of the United Nations on Huma Rights- International Human Rights Referenses to Human Rights Violations on the Grounds of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity.- March-April 2005

(PDF - 986 KB) Document Date: 1 Apr 2005
  Iran: UN General Assembly- Third Committee 60th Session- Oct 2005-
Briefing note on the human rights situation in the Islamic Republic of Iran
(PDF - 224 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2005
  Welcome to the United States a guide to new immigrants- 2005
(PDF - 1,503 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2005
  More than a name- State-Sponsored Homophobia and Its Consequences in Southern Africa-HRW-IGLHRC 2003
More than a Name: State Sponsored Homophobia and Its Consequences in Southern Africa (pdf) (2003):
Co-published with Human Rights Watch, this report evaluates the effects of State-sponsored homophobia on the human rights of sexual and gender minorities in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

(PDF - 1,462 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 2003
  UNDERSTANDING LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER RIGHTS AS HUMAN RIGHTS
University of Minnesota Human Rights Center

Copyright © 2000 Human Rights Resource Center, University of Minnesota

The Human Rights Education Series is published by the Human Rights Resource Center at the University of Minnesota. Edited by Nancy Flowers, the series provides resources for the ever-growing body of educators and activists working to build a culture of human rights in the United States and throughout the world. Topic Book 3, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights: A Human Rights Perspective is jointly published by Amnesty International USA, The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), and the Human Rights Resource Center.

(PDF - 393 KB) Document Date: 1 Dec 2000
  Preparing Sexual Orientation-Based Asylum Claims /A Handbook for Advocates and Asylum Seekers
Written by the Midwest Human Rights Partnership for Sexual Orientation and the Immigration Rights Task Force [now Immigration Equality]
(PDF - 956 KB) Document Date: 1 Feb 2000
  Sexual Rights - Adopted in Hong Kong at the 14th World Congress of Sexology, August 26, 1999 - Pukaar October 2009 Issue 67 : http://nfi.net/Oct09Pukaar.pdf
"Sexuality is an integral part of the personality of every human being. Its full development depends upon the satisfaction of basic human needs such as the desire for contact, intimacy, emotional expression, pleasure, tenderness and love. Sexuality is constructed through the interaction between the individual and social structures. Full development of sexuality is essential for individual, interpersonal, and societal well- being. Sexual rights are universal human rights based on the inherent freedom, dignity, and equality of all human beings."
(PDF - 60 KB) Document Date: 26 Aug 1999
  THE GAY BAR: Victoria Neilson & Aaron Morris* 9/17/98
THE EFFECT OF THE ONE-YEAR FILING DEADLINE ON LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER, AND HIV-POSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONALS SEEKING ASYLUM OR WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL
(PDF - 405 KB) Document Date: 17 Aug 1998
  NCLR- LGBT Asylum cases
Matter of Toboso-Alfonso, 20 I&N Dec. 819 (B.I.A. 1990)
Pitcherskaia v. INSI 118 F.3d 641, 645 (9th Circ. 1997) )
Hernandez-Montiel v. INS 225 F.3d 1088 (9th Cir. 2000) )
Kvartenko v. Ashcroft, 33 Fed.Appx. 262 (9th Cir. 2002) )
Ford v. Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Interim Field Office Director for Detention and Removal for Philadelphia Dist., 294 F.Supp.2d 655 (M.D.Pa. 2003) )
Amanfi v. Ashcroft 328 F.3d 719 (3d Cir. 2003) )
Zhen Xiung Lin v. Ashcroft, 81 Fed. Appx. 403 (3d Cir. 2003) )
Parker v. Ashcroft, 112 Fed.Appx. 860 (3d. Cir, 2004) )
Reyes-Reyes v. Ashcroft 384 F.3d 782 (9th Cir. 2004) )
Molathwa v. Ashcroft 390 F.3d 551 (8th Cir. 2004) )
Burog-Perez v. I.N.S., 95 Fed. Appx. 886 (9th Cir. 2004) )
Cornejo-Merida v. Ashcroft, 116 Fed.Appx. 900 (9th Cir. 2004) )
Uribe v. Ashcroft 105 Fed. Appx. 941 (9th Cir. 2004) )
Kun Ko Lin v. Ashcroft 99 Fed. Appx. 810 (9th Cir. 2004) )
Substantial evidence supported IJ's adverse credibility finding where alien's Galicia v. Ashcroft 396 F.3d 446 (1st Cir. 2005) )
Safadi v. Gonzales, 148 Fed.Appx. 372 (6th Cir. 2005) )
Ali v. Gonzales, 160 Fed.Appx. 485 (7th Cir. 2005) )
Salkeld v. Gonzalez 420 F.3d 804 (8th Cir. 2005) )
Kimumwe v. Gonzalez 431 F.3d 319 (8th Cir. 2005) )
Badalian v. Gonzales, 148 Fed.Appx. 638 (9th Cir. 2005) )
Boer-Sedano v. Gonzalez 418 F.3d 1082, (9th Cir. 2005) )
Comparan v. Gonzales, 144 Fed.Appx. 673 (9th Cir. 2005) )
Karouni v. Gonzalez 399 F.3d 1163 (9th Cir. 2005) )
Loya-Loya v. Gonzales, 153 Fed.Appx. 441 (9th Cir. 2005) )
Pena-Torres v. Gonzales, 128 Fed.Appx. 628 (9th Cir. 2005) )
Wei Yong Ni v. United States AG 157 Fed. Appx. 455 (2d Cir. 2005) )
Pozos v. Gonzales, 141 Fed. Appx. 629 (9th Cir. 2005) )
Rico v. United States AG 154 Fed. Appx. 875 (11th Cir. 2005) )
Joaquin-Porras v. Gonzales, 435 F.3d 172 (2nd Cir. 2006) )
Maledonado v. United States AG 2006 U.S. App. Lexis 18010 (3d Cir. 2006) )
Jean-Pierre v. AG of the United States, 2006 U.S. App. LEXIS 14955 (3d Cir. 2006) )
Morett v. Gonzales, 2006 U.S. App. Lexis 18152 (2d Cir. 2006) )
Tavera Lara v. United States AG 2006 U.S. App. LEXIS 16749 (11th Cir. 2006) )
Kibuuka v. Gonzales 2006 U.S. App. LEXIS 9364 (1st Cir. 2006) )
Copyright © 1999-2006 NCLR

(PDF - 119 KB) Document Date: 1 Jan 1990
  Links:
  2008 Hate Crime Survey - Human Rights First
Hate crime continues to rise in many parts of Europe and North America according to our 2008 Hate Crime Survey, a second annual report examining bias-driven violence in 2007 and 2008.

The 2008 Hate Crime Survey includes sections examining six facets of violent hate crime in the 56 countries that comprise the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). The Survey also examines government responses to violent hate crimes in sections on Systems of Monitoring and Reporting and The Framework of Criminal Law and includes a Ten-Point Plan for governments to strengthen their responses. The Survey also takes an in-depth look at the Russian Federation, Ukraine, and the United States and contains a Country Panorama section that profiles individual hate crime cases from more than 30 countries within the OSCE.

http://www.humanrightsfirst.org/discrimination/pages.aspx?id=157
  2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices- 03/11/2010
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/index.htm
  2009 IDAHO International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia May 17 2009 -Around the world.
http://idahomophobia.org/wp/
  2010 US Country Reports on Human Rights Practices -04/08/11
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2010/index.htm
  Civil Society Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law [Uganda]
The Coalition was established in October 2009 in response to the tabling of a now notorious Anti-Homosexuality Bill in the Ugandan Parliament.

While in the long run the Coalition hopes to tackle numerous issues related to human rights and constitutional law in Uganda, at this point in time our website is dedicated to our campaign to see the now notorious Anti-Homosexuality Bill dropped from Parliament's agenda.

http://www.ugandans4rights.org/
  Constructing the Personal Narratives of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Asylum Claimants
By: Laurie Berg and Jenni Millbank - Link provided by Immigration Equality, New York, NY.

This article draws upon psychological and sociological literature to explore the issues that arise in eliciting and presenting a refugee narrative when the claim is based upon sexual orientation. Rigid notions of homosexual identity may consciously or subconsciously shape decision-makers? approaches in this field. First, we identify psycho-social issues of particular significance to lesbian, gay and bisexual claimants which may act as barriers to eliciting their narrative of self-identity, including: a reluctance to reveal group membership as the basis of a claim,

http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/22/2/195
  Council for Global Equality - Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity References U.S. Department of State Human Rights Reports for 2008  (Released February 25, 2009) 
2008 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices 
* Note that HIV/AIDS?related excerpts from the Human Rights Reports can be found at:  http://www.glaa.org/archive/2009/CountryReportsHIV2008.shtml. 

http://www.globalequality.org/storage/cfge/documents/dos_report_sogi_references_2008.pdf
  FrontLine- Protection of Human Rights defenders
Front Line is the International Foundation for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders. Front Line was founded in Dublin in 2001 with the specific aim of protecting human rights defenders at risk, people who work, non-violently, for any or all of the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Front Line aims to address some of the needs identified by defenders themselves, including protection, networking, training and access to international bodies that can take action on their behalf.
http://www.frontlinedefenders.org/
  HIV/AIDS & Human Rights - Human Rights Watch 12/30/07
At the close of 2007, 33 million people are living with HIV. In just 12 months, 2.5 million people became infected with the virus, and 2 million people died of it.

HIV-related human rights abuses occur all over the world, but tend to disproportionately affect communities that are already marginalized and discriminated against: women and girls, men who have sex with men, sex workers, injecting drug users, immigrants, and prisoners. In the past year, Human Rights Watch has focused its work on documenting the human rights abuses these individuals face, and pressing for changes to end these abuses. We have worked to:

http://hrw.org/doc/?t=hivaids&document_limit=0,2
  Human Rights World Report 2011 [sexual orientation/HIV]
Kenya continues to punish consensual adult sexual conduct with up to 14 years imprisonment. On February 11, following unsubstantiated rumors of a "gay wedding" in the coastal town of Mtwapa, influential Muslim and Christian religious leaders demanded the closure of the Mtwapa office of the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), which conducts research on HIV/AIDS with men who have sex with men. The religious leaders issued a statement promising to "flush out gays" in Mtwapa. On February 12, a group of over 200 individuals-armed with sticks, stones, and other makeshift weapons-surrounded KEMRI. Smaller mobs went to the homes of people suspected of being gay. The police attempted to protect the individuals targeted by the mob by taking them into custody. Another mob severely beat up a KEMRI volunteer on February 13. Two individuals were beaten up in Mombasa on suspicion of being gay, on February 13 and 16 respectively. In Mtwapa, Mombasa, and elsewhere, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people went into hiding in fear for their lives, and HIV/AIDS outreach, testing, and treatment among men who have sex with men remains compromised by the attacks and the continuing climate of homophobia.
http://www.hrw.org/en/world-report-2011
  IGLHRC General Research Links
General research links and tools for those seeking further information on human rights LGBT / HIV+ country conditions.
http://www.iglhrc.org/site/iglhrc/content.php?type=1&id=69
  ILGA: LGTBI Rights in the World 2008
ILGA is proud to send you the 2008 version of its map on LGBTI rights in the world.
the map is accessible on www.ilga.org We encourage you to publish it or have it published by your media contacts or for exhibition purposes.

http://www.ilga.org/map/LGBTI_rights.jpg
  Immigration Equality- Legal Decisions
Until recently, there was very little precedent in the area of LGBT and HIV-based asylum law. Since 2003, the number of precedential LGBT asylum cases has more than tripled. Not surprisingly, the Ninth Circuit has continued to expand asylum, withholding and CAT protections for LGBT individuals, but other Circuits have taken much narrower views of what constitutes persecution in this context.

LGBT/HIV PRECEDENTIAL AND NON-PRECEDENTIAL ASYLUM TABLE -- UPDATED SUMMER 2007

http://www.immigrationequality.org/template.php?pageid=204
  LGBT Legal Status Around the World- Amnesty International
http://www.amnestyusa.org/lgbt-human-rights/country-information/page.do?id=1106576
  Love, hate and the law: decriminalizing homosexuality- Amnesty International- 07/04/08
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/POL30/003/2008/en

Index Number: POL 30/003/2008
Date Published: 4 July 2008

The paper explores the different legal approaches to criminalizing homosexuality, including less direct approaches that may not explicitly criminalize same-sex sexual conduct but instead seek to prevent the promotion of homosexuality, protect children, or respond to public health concerns. Decriminalization is not the whole answer, but it is a key step towards respecting, protecting and fulfilling the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, same-sex practicing and transgender people.

http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/POL30/003/2008/en
  The HIV / AIDS encyclopedia
The main part of ÆGIS is its database, which you can access using the SEARCH, LIBRARY, and NEWS buttons on the left. Because the database is so big -- 750,000+ documents -- it's easy to get lost.

This Topics section is our HIV/AIDS ENCYCLOPEDIA, a way of making the most commonly used material available instantly.

CLICK on Key Topics:
the basics
treatment
resistance testing
prevention
exposure issues
living with hiv
the science of hiv
youth
women's issues
other groups

http://www.aegis.com/
  The World of Immigration Detention: A System Hidden in Plain Sight DWN [USA]
Welcome to the world of immigration detention, where over 27,000 immigrants are detained on any given day in almost 200 prison-like facilities across the country. The map below includes contact information for:
* Facilities known to detain immigrants in removal proceedings (red dots on map)
* Immigration and Customs Enforcement district offices (black dots)
* Legal service organizations who provide representation or referrals to immigrants detained (green dots)
Are there immigrants detained near you? Click on a state to zoom in; touch a dot and get more info.

http://detentionwatchnetwork.org/dwn_map
  Thirty countries deport HIV+ migrant workers, sixty six countries discriminate HIV+ travellers, including 19 in the WHO Europe region. ILGA 12/08/08
08/12/2008

Civil society calls for action to remove HIV related travel and residence regulations for people living with HIV in time for the Vienna World Aids Conference in 2010.

States should do whatever possible to insure that legal discrimination of people with HIV ceases to exist. People with HIV should have the same rights than others.

It is the responsibility of policy makers to build up a society that does not discriminate on the ground of HIV status.

http://www.ilga.org/print.asp?LanguageID=1&FileID=1201&FileCategory=55&ZoneID=7&
  Tracking the legality of same-sex marriage around the world -12/29/09
Only seven countries[ The Netherlands Belgium, Spain, Canada, South Africa, Norway and Sweden] in the world permit gay marriage to be performed, although recognition of civil unions exists in some nations. Gay couples still face persecution and even the death penalty in many countries
http://worldfocus.org/blog/2009/12/29/tracking-the-legality-of-same-sex-marriage-around-the-world/9035/
 
 

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